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Monday - July 20, 2015

From: Oberlin, OH
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Plant Lists, Wildlife Gardens, Shrubs
Title: Native Ohio Shubs for Wildlife
Answered by: Anne Van Nest

QUESTION:

Hi, I'm looking to plant shrubs and bushes for in front of our home this week but would like to plant some that are good for wildlife including bees and birds. Do you have any suggestions for northern Ohio that would be good for this? Thank you for your help!

ANSWER:

First take a look at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center website Native Plants page. On the left side is a list with Special Collections being one of the page links. Next click Butterflies and Moths of North America, then narrow your search by selecting Ohio and shrubs. This will give you 36 plants to look consider.   You can further refine your search by selecting sun or shade, etc. Once you have your tentative list, you can look for more wildlife characteristics for each plant by looking at the "benefit" section. For example New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus) attracts birds and butterflies.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


New jersey tea
Ceanothus americanus

Leadplant
Amorpha canescens

Common buttonbush
Cephalanthus occidentalis

Alternateleaf dogwood
Cornus alternifolia

Smooth hydrangea
Hydrangea arborescens

Mountain laurel
Kalmia latifolia

Fragrant sumac
Rhus aromatica

Steeplebush
Spiraea tomentosa

Common snowberry
Symphoricarpos albus

Southern arrowwood
Viburnum dentatum

Hobblebush
Viburnum lantanoides

American cranberry bush
Viburnum opulus var. americanum

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