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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Saturday - January 31, 2015

From: RICEVILLE, TN
Region: Southeast
Topic: Pollinators, Wildlife Gardens, Trees
Title: Is Franklinia alatamaha (Franklin tree) a major honeybee nectar source?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Is the Franklinia tree a major nectar source for honeybees?

ANSWER:

The Franklinia alatamaha (Franklin tree) doesn't appear on our list of Special Value to Honey Bees, Special Value to Native Bees or Special Value to Bumble Bees from the Pollinator Program at The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.  That doesn't mean that honey bees don't visit it, but it doesn't appear to be a major nectar source for honeybees—or any bees for that matter.   If you are looking for a tree that will be a major source for honeybees, visit our page for Special Value to Honey Bees and use the NARROW YOUR SEARCH option in the left sidebar and select "Tennessee" from the Select State or Province slot and "Tree" from General Appearance slot.  You will find a list of 46 trees that grow in Tennessee that are major nectar sources for honeybees.

 

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