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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Wednesday - February 18, 2015

From: Paradise, CA
Region: California
Topic: Privacy Screening, Shrubs
Title: Evergreen privacy screen in California
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Hello, My family and I just bought a house in Paradise CA. I want to.plant privacy plants that are native to northern California. I would like the plant to be green all year but drought resistant if possible

ANSWER:

Below are six native California evergreen shrubs/small trees that would provide privacy screening and are shown to grow in Butte County, California by the USDA Plants Database.

Arctostaphylos patula (Greenleaf manzanita) grows to 6 feet.  Here is more information from Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS).

Baccharis pilularis (Coyotebrush) grows to 6 feet.  Here is more information from Sonoma County Master Gardeners and the University of California.

Cercocarpus montanus (Alderleaf mountain mahogany) can grow as high as 12 feet.  Here is more information from Blue Planet Biomes.

Dendromecon rigida (Tree poppy) grows to 6 feet or more. Here is more information from Golden West College in Huntington Beach.

Fremontodendron californicum (California flannelbush) grows to 12 feet.   Here is more information from San Francisco Botanical Garden.

Heteromeles arbutifolia (Toyon) generally grows to 8 feet, but can grow taller.  Here is more information from Golden West College in Huntington Beach.

 

From the Image Gallery


Greenleaf manzanita
Arctostaphylos patula

Coyotebrush
Baccharis pilularis

Alderleaf mountain mahogany
Cercocarpus montanus

Tree poppy
Dendromecon rigida

California flannelbush
Fremontodendron californicum

Toyon
Heteromeles arbutifolia

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