Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Friday - June 13, 2008

From: Las Cruces, NM
Region: Southwest
Topic: Privacy Screening, Shrubs, Trees
Title: Evergreen plants for a windbreak
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Our church has need to plant a windbreak. We would like fast growing native plants, preferably evergreen or really early 'leafers' to protect us from our windy season beginning in mid/late February.

ANSWER:

Here are several evergreen or semi-evergreen shrubs native to New Mexico that should work well. To see more possibilities visit the Recommended Species page and click on New Mexico on the map for a list of commercially available native plant species suitable for landscaping.

Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush) evergreen

Atriplex canescens (fourwing saltbush) semi-evergreen

Cercocarpus montanus (alderleaf mountain mahogany) almost evergreen

Fendlera rupicola (cliff fendlerbush) deciduous to semi-evergreen

Fraxinus greggii (Gregg's ash) almost evergreen

Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain juniper) evergreen, small tree to 40 feet

Larrea tridentata (creosote bush) evergreen

Pinus edulis (twoneedle pinyon) evergreen, small tree 10-30 feet

Yucca elata (soaptree yucca) evergreen

Yucca torreyi (Torrey's yucca) evergreen

 

From the Image Gallery


Big sagebrush
Artemisia tridentata

Chamiso
Atriplex canescens

Alderleaf mountain mahogany
Cercocarpus montanus

Cliff fendlerbush
Fendlera rupicola

Gregg's ash
Fraxinus greggii

Rocky mountain juniper
Juniperus scopulorum

Creosote bush
Larrea tridentata

Colorado pinyon pine
Pinus edulis

Soaptree yucca
Yucca elata

More Shrubs Questions

Fast-growing shrub or tree to block dust from dirt road
March 15, 2009 - I live on a dirt road in Northeast Kansas. Could you recommend a fast growing, low maintenance shrub/bush or small tree that will form a barrier to block the dust from the dirt road? It will be plante...
view the full question and answer

Pollination of Fendlera rupicola
July 17, 2014 - How/by what is Fendlera rupicola pollinated?
view the full question and answer

Groundcover for a Sunny, Steep Slope in Maryland
April 29, 2013 - I need a groundcover for a sunny dry steep slope in Towson, Maryland. The slope goes from the parking lot down to a deck area.
view the full question and answer

Dividing Hesperaloe
December 09, 2015 - How and when can I successfully separate a clump of Hesperaloe Parviflora into smaller bunches?
view the full question and answer

Landscaping in the Southern California desert.
October 16, 2007 - We are located in southern California in Lake Havasu. I'm trying to landscape sloping areas. I have arrow weeds (Pluchea sericea) and want to get rid of them permanently. How can I achieve this or...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.