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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Monday - August 05, 2013

From: Pittsburgh, PA
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Cinnamon scented plant growing along Pennsylvania rivers
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I've walked along both the Youghiogheny and Monongahela Rivers around my hometown and I've noticed moments at which time I would smell the strong, sweet aroma of cinnamon. Given the riverside environments, what's the most likely plant life that may be causing the strong smell? Thank you for your time.

ANSWER:

Here are some possibilities.  All of these plants grow in Pennsylvania—both the natives and non-natives:

Discorea oppositifolia [synonym: Discorea batatas] (Cinnamon vine, Chinese yam or potato vine) an Asian native that occurs in Pennsylvania.   Here are more photos and information from Virginia Tech Weed Identification Guide.

Dodecatheon meadia (Pride-of-ohio) is native to Pennsylvania.   Here is more information from Crescentbloom.com.

Hesperis matronalis (Dame's rocket) is a Eurasian native and is considered invasive or a noxious weed in many parts of the US.  It does grow in Pennsylvania.  Here is more information from Seedaholic.com.

 Calycanthus floridus (Eastern sweetshrub) is native to Pennsylvania.  Here is more information from Plants for a Future.

 

 

From the Image Gallery


Eastern shooting star
Dodecatheon meadia

Eastern shooting star
Dodecatheon meadia

Eastern shooting star
Dodecatheon meadia

Eastern sweetshrub
Calycanthus floridus

Eastern sweetshrub
Calycanthus floridus

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