En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - January 06, 2013

From: Semmes, AL
Region: Southeast
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Pests, Vines
Title: Problems with crossvine from Semmes AL
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a 3 year old cross vine (tangerine beauty) and the leaves have started turning black and falling off the plant. I have two plants growing on the same pergola (opposite ends) and the second plant is beginning to get splotchy leaves and I am afraid both of these beautiful plants will die. What can I do? I can send a photo if that would help. I've tried asking at local garden centers, but no one seems able to help me.

ANSWER:

According to this USDA Plant Profile Map, Bignonia capreolata (Crossvine) grows natively to Mobile County, Alabama. This is usually the first thing we look at when we are trying to diagnose a problem with a plant. Trying to grow a plant in the wrong climate or soil is frequently the first problem we find. In this case, however, it is obviously in the right spot.

Here is a previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer on care of crossvine. From BackyardGardener.com, here is an article on Bignonia capreolata (Crossvine). Scroll down the page and you will find information about spider mites, mealy bugs and fungus, all of which can affect this plant. From your description, we would suspect fungus, possibly caused by poor circulation of air or not enough sun on the plant. Since we can't see the plant (and, sorry, we no longer can accept pictures) we will have to give you information to make your own diagnosis.

 

From the Image Gallery


Crossvine
Bignonia capreolata

Crossvine
Bignonia capreolata

Crossvine
Bignonia capreolata

More Diseases and Disorders Questions

Muhly grass slow to green up from Spring Hill FL
August 04, 2012 - Have lots of muhly grass planted 3 yrs ago. This yr about 1/3 are VERY slow. Still look like hay stacks. No pattern in the bed. You mentioned pesticides being too close?
view the full question and answer

How to treat bark damage on oak tree
November 15, 2011 - I have an oak tree approx. 50 ft., live in austin, texas. the tree has dropped bark about 3-4 ft above ground, in a section of 4 inches by 8 inches, and the tree appears dark where the bark was. is ...
view the full question and answer

Time for trimming oaks from Boerne TX
July 03, 2012 - I want to trim a native red oak but am scared to touch it because I dont want to lose it. It is the primary source of shade in our back yard. Also I want to trim the live oaks and am surrounded with O...
view the full question and answer

Strange growth on oak tree
August 26, 2008 - i have a very strange round segmented growth on a tree in my yard. i think the tree is a chinkapin oak and the growth is a reddish color. it looks like a ball with suction cups on it. it is very st...
view the full question and answer

Problems with non-native weeping willow from Hazlet NJ
July 03, 2013 - Leaves turning yellow on weeping willow planted in May. What causes this and how can I fix it? Mother's Day gift after SANDY uprooted huge tree.
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center