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Mr. Smarty Plants - Native wild plum trees for Johnson County, Texas

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Monday - December 24, 2012

From: Rio Vista, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Native wild plum trees for Johnson County, Texas
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

What native wild plums will grow in southern Johnson County? And where can I find the trees locally? Thank you

ANSWER:

There are four native plums that either grow in Johnson County or in nearby or adjacent counties.  They are:

Prunus rivularis (Creek plum) occurs in Johnson County according to the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

Prunus gracilis (Oklahoma plum) is shown by the USDA Plants Database distribution map as occurring in adjacent Tarrant County.

Prunus mexicana (Mexican plum) occurs in Parker, Tarrant, Dallas, Kaufman and Erath Counties according to the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

Prunus umbellata (Hog plum) occurs in adjacent Tarrant County according to the USDA Plants Database distribution map.

You can visit the our National Suppliers Directory to look for nurseries in your area that carry these native plum trees.  Here are a couple that I found that carry at least one of the species above:

Weston Gardens in Bloom, Inc. in Fort Worth

Stuart Nursery, Inc. in Weatherford

You might also check the "Where Can You Buy Native Plants in the Dallas/Fort Worth Area?" page under Links and Resources on the webpage of the North Central Texas Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas.

 

From the Image Gallery


Creek plum
Prunus rivularis

Creek plum
Prunus rivularis

Oklahoma plum
Prunus gracilis

Mexican plum
Prunus mexicana

Mexican plum
Prunus mexicana

Hog plum
Prunus umbellata

Hog plum
Prunus umbellata

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