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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Saturday - April 28, 2012

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Pests, Shrubs
Title: What is hollowing out my rosebuds in Austin, TX?
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I recently noticed some of my rose buds had been hollowed out from the inside. I have seen no evidence of insect though. What do you think it is and how can I treat the problem?

ANSWER:

First, a word from our sponsor; The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes. While there are over a dozen wild native roses in the US, Mr. Smarty Plants is thinking that you probably have one of the varieties of cultured roses that are hybridized descendants of roses whose origin is China or Europe. These fall outside the focus and expertise of the Lady Bird Johnson Wild flower Center.

However, I’ve been able to find some information that you may find interesting and helpful.

This site from Dave’sgarden.com has an interesting history of native roses and naturalized roses in the US.

The Rose Gardening Guru.com has some rose growing tips and identifies two possible culprits for your rose molestation.

Two other sites with helpful information about growing roses are lillysrosegarden.com, and planet natural.com.

For help from folks here in Austin, you may want to contact the Austin Rose Society.

 

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