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Tuesday - October 18, 2011

From: Johnson City, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Seed and Plant Sources, Trees
Title: Need source for seeds or plants of Pinus remota in Johnson City, TX..
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I cannot seem to find a source for Pinus remota or papershell pinyon pine. Who Grows this? I understand it is rare and would love to try it here in Johnson City. Thanks

ANSWER:

The name may tell it all; Pinus remota (Papershell pinyon). This USDA Distribution Map shows it occurring in counties southwest of Gillespie County. The eco-region map from texastreeid.tamu.edu has further information about where and how this tree lives. This link to Plants for a Future, and this one to aggiehorticulture have additional information about this tree. It may do well in Johnson City; the soil texture, pH, and drainage are going to be important factors.

The May, 2007 issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine, “A Pine Beyond Time”, has an interesting article about Pinus remota. In it, the author tells of the work of Dan Hosage, the owner of  Madrone Nursery in San Marcos, who has worked with P. remota germination and seedlings. His contact information is on the website, and he should be able to tell you about availability.

A discussion on the Garden Web forum tells about the location of stands P. remota in its range in southwest Texas. Perhaps you could collect some seeds.



 

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