Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
1 rating

Sunday - July 24, 2011

From: Burleson, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives, Planting, Trees
Title: Yard Trees for Burleson, TX
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

We need to replace 2 mature pear trees in our front yard, north side of the house in Burleson, TX. We are looking for faster growing trees that will last for decades that resist disease in clay soil. The area is roughly 30'x 50'. What is our best choice and is there a problem replanting where the pears are currently? The pears were so dense the grass has died back with lack of sun so we would like a less dense tree that will add curb appeal.

ANSWER:

What Mr Smarty Plants likes to do is recommend that you check out the recommended species list for North Central Texas.  You can sort through the list- so you can select trees of the height you prefer and start to consider options.  I found 13 trees when I looked for those in the 36 to 72 ft. height.

Unfortunately, "faster-growing" and "last for decades" are slightly contradictory.  Some fast growing options are Acer negundo (Ash-leaf maple) and Ulmus crassifolia (Cedar elm)

Some Oaks also grow relatively fast.  Quercus muehlenbergii (Chinkapin oak) and Quercus texana (Nuttall oak) are quite attractive, Quercus texana (Nuttall oak) may do better in your clay soil.  If you are willing to wait for your tree, magnificent varieties such as Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore) and Carya illinoinensis (Pecan) do well in your region, but are probably a bit tall for a yard the size of yours. 

 Is there a problem planting them where the pears are currently?  Well, a little.  Are the pears still there?  If so, the roots will continue to compete for water for some time.  Make sure you remove the stumps and, if you can, you will want to start your new trees outside of their existing dripline, just to minimize the competition.  Similarly, you noted you want a less dense tree with better curb appeal.  All of those recommended above will produce a very attractive tree.  You can improve density and curb appeal by judicious pruning and raising the canopy when it is mature enough.

 

From the Image Gallery


Ash-leaf maple
Acer negundo

American sycamore
Platanus occidentalis

More Trees Questions

Disappearing oranges from Satsuma orange in Austin
June 25, 2008 - I had many tiny future oranges on my Satsuma Orange Tree until a few days ago. Suddenly, all were gone except one. They weren't on the ground and the tree itself seems incredibly healthy. It is gr...
view the full question and answer

Timing for transplanting a yaupon in Louisiana
January 01, 2009 - I found a female yaupon growing wild at the back of my property and would like to move it to the front. When should I do this?
view the full question and answer

Yellow, pale green leaves on Cedar Elms in Texas
August 30, 2008 - I have had several cedar elms of various sizes planted in our yard over the last 10 years. Only the largest has dark green, healthy looking leaves. All the others have yellowish, pale green leaves. Th...
view the full question and answer

Redbud leaves turning yellow in mid-summer
July 13, 2012 - The leaves on our redbud trees are turning yellow. The yellow leaves are pale with no other spots and no dark veins. I don't know for sure which variety of redbud they are or how old they are (more t...
view the full question and answer

Are baldcypress trees (Taxodium distichum) self-fertile
March 06, 2011 - We are considering planting a bald cypress in a grassy children's play area that has fair amount of clay in the soil and receives a good amount of rain water from an adjacent slope. This seems a good...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.