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Thursday - July 07, 2011

From: Ft. Worth, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Invasive Plants, Herbs/Forbs
Title: Controlling Straggler Daisy
Answered by: Brigid & Larry Larson

QUESTION:

Is there a barrier I can use that will keep Straggler Daisy under control so that I will not be a problem for my neighbors?

ANSWER:

You’ve got a good chance. It’s really nice that you are trying to shield your neighbor.  Mr Smarty Plants happily recommends Calyptocarpus vialis (Straggler daisy) most of the time when a native ground cover is requested, but then as I researched this question, it’s clear that there is a general love/hate relationship going on about Horseherb!

In our own Wildflower Center record, it says “Depending on your point of view, Straggler Daisy or Horseherb is a pest or a welcome, shade-tolerant groundcover that tolerates moderate foot traffic.”  Dave’s Garden definitely showed a mixed opinion.  Postings on the Grackel and on Austin Wildflower were definitely a bit more positive.

So, what to do to protect your neighbor?  An earlier question on Mr Smarty Plants received an unusually  civil answer when a general removal using herbicide was discussed. (I must have been feeling easy that day!) 

My preference is much more for the solution mentioned in this discussion on “WherePlantsRule”.  Straggler Daisy propagates through seeds, stolons and rhizomes.  It makes sense that a good thick layer of mulch applied near the fenceline should pretty much either stop the stolons and rhizomes or at least make them really easy to pull.  I’d give this a try!

 

From the Image Gallery


Horseherb
Calyptocarpus vialis

Horseherb
Calyptocarpus vialis

Horseherb
Calyptocarpus vialis

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