En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Trees for small spaces from San Jose CA

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - May 09, 2011

From: San Jose, CA
Region: California
Topic: Trees
Title: Trees for small spaces from San Jose CA
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

What tree can you plant in a corner of a yard 3ft from a fence? What is the best shade tree for a small yard with a pool?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants hates to disappoint gardeners, but some requests are for plants that really won't work in the described situation. There are several trees that could be planted in the corner of a fence that would do well in your area. The questions you will have to ask yourself are: (1) can the roots go under the fence and are they going to interfere with any paving or landscaping on either side, yours or the neighbor's? and (2) ditto for the top of the tree. Depending on how tall the tree and how tall the fence, the crown or leafy top may already be at the top of the fence or soon get there. Then what? Is the tree going to shade something in your neighbor's yard that he doesn't want shaded? Or drop leaves, flowers, seeds, etc. on both sides of the fence? In terms of shade in a small yard with a pool, we don't want to be flip, but have you considered a large umbrella?

Roots of trees generally extend at least as far out as the shadow of the canopy of the tree. This area is referred to as the Protected Root Zone (PRZ). While a tree and its rootball would probably initially fit into the 3 ft. space in the fence corner, the roots will quickly grow beyond it.  Additionally, the roots of the tree have the potential to damage/crack any concrete they encounter as they grow trying to reach water and oxygen.

We are frequently asked for "taproot trees," on the assumption that a root that grows straight down will not interfere with concrete walks, driveways, sidewalks and foundations. Alas, some trees do begin with a taproot but there are few trees with a true taproot; as time goes by roots will spread from that center root, both in search of water and nutrients and also as a base to stabilize the tree in the ground. A tree tall enough, and with comparable width to provide shade for your pool area, is going to have roots extending far beyond the initial area, if either the tree or the pool survive the planting there. A tree big enough to cast shade, say, 20 ft. tall, will usually have about the same spread-20' wide. The roots beneath that tree will normally spread out from two to three times farther than the crown.

There are shrubs that might fit into that corner space and or not interfere with your pool, but they will not get big enough to cast appreciable shade. What they will cast is leaves, twigs, bugs, fruit and seeds into that pool, that will need cleaning up.

We are going to list a few shrubs that are native to the Santa Clara Co. area in central coastal California, USDA Hardiness Zone 9. Shrubs have less invasive roots than trees, can maintain a space in the landscape; some are evergreen, but they won't get big enough for shade. We will find suggestions for you by going to our Recommended Species section, clicking on Northern California on the map, and searching on the sidebar at the right-hand side of the page on "shrub" for Habit. Follow each plant link to our webpage on that plant to find out more about size, growth habits, care, sun requirements, etc. You can use the same technique to make other choices or select trees, herbaceous blooming plants and so forth.

Shrubs for Central California:

Amelanchier alnifolia (Saskatoon serviceberry) - deciduous, 3-18 ft. tall, blooms white April to June, can grow in sun, part sun or shade

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (Kinnikinnick) - trailing, 1-3 ft., evergreen, blooms white, pink March to June, sun, part shade or shade

Ceanothus velutinus (Snowbrush) - evergreen, 6-12 ft., sun, part shade or shade,  blooms white April to August

Garrya elliptica (Wavyleaf silktassel)- evergreen, 10 ft., sun or part shade, blooms white December to February. Pictures from Google.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Amelanchier alnifolia


Arctostaphylos uva-ursi


Ceanothus velutinus

 

 

 

More Trees Questions

Selection of trees for new home
June 30, 2008 - We are moving to Roanoke, Texas(Denton County) into a new home. Our home will have 3 trees which we can choose. They are Texas Ash, Live Oak, Sweetgum, Silver Leak maple, Cedar Elm and Bradford Pear...
view the full question and answer

Small to medium specimen native tree for Texas Hill Country
August 20, 2004 - Can you recommend a small to med. 'specimen' tree to plant near our patio? Full sun, drought tolerant, interesting during different seasons. Thought about Blanco Crabapple, Rusty Blackhaw, Smoke Tr...
view the full question and answer

Are non-native Chinese pistache poisonous to alpacas from Galt CA
October 07, 2012 - Are Chinese Pistachio trees poisonous to alpacas?
view the full question and answer

Pruning a Young Cercis canadensis (Redbud) Tree
April 05, 2014 - I have a redbud tree that was transplanted when very young (five years ago). It just started budding last year. It is growing very well but the branches are low. It's like it's growing out instead o...
view the full question and answer

Treatment of black mildew on magnolia
April 17, 2008 - I think my magnolia has black mildew. How do I treat it?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center