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Thursday - February 10, 2011

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Diseases and Disorders, Planting, Transplants
Title: Possible transplant shock in recently planted Anacua in San Antonio, TX.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I planted an Anacua tree from a nursery this past November. The tree I purchased was about 6ft tall and was a leftover from the spring. The roots were pretty wound up inside. After shaking the roots loose, I planted it in some bulk garden soil from Gardenville, added some root growth liquid that the nursery had suggested, and watered it. Shortly after, the sparse leaves that it had turned brown on the tips and fell off. The branches are not brittle. Did I kill my tree or did it just lose its foliage due to stress and come back in the spring?

ANSWER:

Anacua Ehretia anacua (Anacua) is a sub-tropical, evergreen or partly deciduous ornamental in Texas. It is hardy in dry areas, and checking the USDA County Dristribution Map indicates that you have it growing in the right area. Check the Soil Description and the Conditions Comments on the Native Plant Database page to see if it is in the right kind of soil.

The first thing that comes to mind is transplant shock. You had a root-bound tree that is now adjusting to its new surroundings. To determine if it is still alive, do the "thumbnail test". Scratch off the bark on an upper limb with your thumb; if you find green tissue under the bark, that's a good sign. If you don't find green tissue, move further down the stem and test again. Keep repeating until you reach the bottom of the plant. If you find no green tissue, I'm afraid its "aloha Anacua".

But let's be more optimistic!

I'm including several links dealing with transplant shock (how to prevent it and treat it), proper tree planting techniques, and care of saplings. One of the most common mistakes is overwatering newly planted trees.

Transplant shock

    gardeningknowhow.com

    University of Kentucky

Tree Planting

     texastreeplanting.tamu.edu

     Clemson University


Ehretia anacua


Ehretia anacua

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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