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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Friday - February 11, 2011

From: Fort Davis, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: White powder on non-native houseplants from Fort Davis TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have a white powder on my houseplants that I can't figure out what it is or what to do about it? (Dracaena & Corn plants) Could be a fungus can you help? (can send a photo if you will tell me how to do so)

ANSWER:

Both plants you mention are members of the genus Dracaena, and native to Africa. Most houseplants do tend to be non-native to North America, and often are tropicals that can survive the extremes of temperature indoors. For information on Dracaena in general, here is an article from Clemson University Extension. For information on the care of Dracaena massangeana, see this page on FAQ's for Corn Plants from houseplants-care.

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the growth, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which the plants are being grown.

 

 

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