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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Thursday - December 16, 2010

From: Kingston, WA
Region: Northwest
Topic: Erosion Control
Title: Native grasses for erosion control in the state of Washington
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Which native grasses do you suggest for maximum erosion control in my area?

ANSWER:

The following perennial grasses native to Kitsap County would be effective in erosion control.  Since I don't know the particular conditions of your site you should check the stated "GROWING CONDITIONS" for each species in our Native Plant Database to see if they correspond with the conditions at your site.

Agrostis exarata (Spike bentgrass) and here are photos and more information.

Bromus carinatus (California brome) and here are photos and more information.

Calamagrostis canadensis (Bluejoint)

Danthonia spicata (Poverty oatgrass) and here are photos and more information.

Deschampsia cespitosa (Tufted hairgrass)

Elymus glaucus (Blue wild rye) and here are photos and more information.  This grass is particular noted for its erosion control qualities.

Glyceria striata (Fowl mannagrass) and here are photos and more information.

Here are a few photos from our Image Gallery:


Calamagrostis canadensis

Deschampsia cespitosa

Glyceria striata

 

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