En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Erosion control in New York

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - July 21, 2008

From: Hamden, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Erosion Control
Title: Erosion control in New York
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am in zone 5/4 New York and I recently purchased a house with two erosion problems- 1. a seasonal stream has cut a gorge about 20 'deep X 40' long.Mature hemlocks are toppling into this hole. it is semi shade, moist clay soil. 2. A fill bank of nearly pure clay,mostly rock at about 80 degrees,full sun. On this site,erosion is so bad that a mature stand of Polygonum cuspidatum (Japanese Knotweed) has been unable to advance,though I am in continual battle with it at the top of the slope. After a winter the gullies are 2' deep and 100' long. I have considered wattling willows but the bank is dangerously steep. I do have the capability to grow 1000's of plants to a gallon size Thank you

ANSWER:

Wow! When we get canyons like that in Texas, we call them state parks and charge admission. Of course, it has quit raining here, so we haven't had any new parks open up recently.

To be honest, we think this is probably beyond the scope of what we can do with native plants, or maybe any plants. Our specialty at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is the care, protection and propagation of plants native to the area in which they are grown. It sounds more like you need a firm of civil engineers than advice from gardeners. If mature trees and Japanese knotweed are unable to hold their own against the erosion, we can't think of anything else that could. This doesn't sound like a feature that could have been hidden beneath a neatly mowed lawn. Did you have some plans for the site when you purchased it?

Because we don't know zip about construction of retaining walls, etc. we tried to find some websites that could at least give you some ideas of where to start. This first one is actually from a California nursery. They do recommend some plants, but they are all suitable to California. Las Pilitas Simple erosion control for a hillside or garden slope.(California) Another site from the California government has some more ideas for construction or basic erosion prevention. We realize New York is way different from California, but we couldn't find any sites on controlling erosion in New York. We would definitely recommend that you call in some professionals in site control. If that crevice keeps growing and that bank keeps sliding, you're going to run out of a place for your house.

 

More Erosion Control Questions

Stabilizing a steep slope in KY
March 31, 2011 - We are building a new home and have a very steep hill behind the home. Our highlift operator just cleared it off - I would say about 15 to 20 feet in height and at least 150 feet in length. What wou...
view the full question and answer

Plants for erosion control in arid region
September 29, 2008 - In semi arid south west (Phoenix), the drainage is managed by creating incised channels. Typically, the dirt channel can erode with even very low velocities of moving water. To reduce erosion therefor...
view the full question and answer

Removing Texas cedar Juniperus ashei from Blanco River banks
February 26, 2014 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, Should cedar trees be removed from our Blanco River banks to prevent them from sucking too much of our precious water before it makes it into the river system? If so, what s...
view the full question and answer

Shady Perennial Groundcover Suggestions for Indiana
April 21, 2013 - Could you please recommend perennial groundcovers for Indiana that are low and leafy, self-spreading, non-invasive, deer resistant, and moisture tolerant; and that are good for erosion control on a sh...
view the full question and answer

Plants for steep clay bank in Summerfield OH
April 07, 2012 - Hello, We have a steep 15-20 foot high bank behind our house here in southern Ohio. Probably 50 ft.long. What could we plant for beauty and erosion control. It is nasty clay soil with lots of shale an...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center