En EspaŅol

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - April 16, 2006

From: Georgetown, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Non-native Sandankwa viburnum (Viburnum suspensum) damaged by freeze
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

We live in Georgetown. My Sandankwa Viburnum seem to have been affected by the late freeze. There are now very few leaves and no flowers/buds. Should I cut the plants back, leave them alone, or give up?

ANSWER:

Sandankwa viburnum (Viburnum suspensum) is native to Japan. You do live within the USDA Hardiness Zones recommended for this plant; however, other stressful environmental factors such as drought conditions on top of the freezing temperatures may have adversely affected your plant. Pruning depends on flowering season. Since this species flowers in early spring, they should be pruned right after flowering. Now would be a good time to do it even though your plant hasn't flowered. You might consider a native Viburnum, Rusty black-haw, (Viburnum rufidulum) as a good replacement for this cold-sensitive species.
 

More Non-Natives Questions

Why are invasive, non-natives being sold from Hillsboro TX
August 03, 2012 - Why are nurseries allowed to grow and sell seed from invasive non-native plants like: johnson grass, bermuda grass, and king ranch bluestem? Many times when I contact a nursery or seed distributor as...
view the full question and answer

Comment on previous answer from Austin
October 15, 2013 - Ms Bradford, You just answered my question about St. Augustine grass.. actually, you didn't answer it.. You said "sorry, wrong number". Very funny. I think you misunderstood... I would rather no...
view the full question and answer

Difference between invasive Chinese and Japanese wisterias and native wisteria
September 12, 2014 - Dear Mr or Ms Smarty Plants, Is there any way I can tell for sure if my wisteria is native? I bought it at a place when it was in bloom that sold a lot of native plants. I Would like to know for sure...
view the full question and answer

Information on non-native Erythrinia crista-galli
April 30, 2008 - I am trying to find out some more information on a plant called firemen caps.. How to grow and sun or shade or both..
view the full question and answer

Replacing non-native Paulonia tomentosa in North Carolina
June 25, 2009 - What could I plant in my Winston-Salem, N.C., yard in place of the paulownia tomentosa which is there now (it was NOT something I put there; I only figured out what it was a couple of years ago -- I g...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2015 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center