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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Friday - March 26, 2004

From: Washington, DC
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: Smarty Plants on invasive and exotic plant species
Answered by: Jil M. Swearingen, National Park Service

QUESTION:

Where can I go to learn more about invasive and exotic plant species?

ANSWER:

The following web sites have additional information about invasive and exotic plant species:

Alien Plant Working Group Weeds Gone Wild
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council
National Audubon Society
National Invasive Species Council
National Park Service EPMT
TNC Wildland Invasive Species Team
US Geological Survey
 

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