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Thursday - July 01, 2010

From: El Paso, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Compost and Mulch, Planting, Trees
Title: Distance apart to plant Arizona ash trees in El Paso, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How far apart can I plant two Arizona ash trees?

ANSWER:

Fraxinus velutina (velvet ash) is a moderately fast-growing tree, appropriate for your area of El Paso County, TX. According to this Pima Co. Arizona Extension Office website, the Arizona Ash will grow to a height of 30 to 50 ft., with a spread approximately 2/3 of the height. We would say a distance between trunks of 15 ft. would be about right. The same article says of this tree: "large tree, out of scale for most residences." So you might be happier with just one tree. And we sure hope you are planning your Fall planting, because you should not try to plant this tree or any other woody plant in Arizona until late Fall, when the plant will be semi-dormant and temperatures lower. If you have already purchased your trees and they are standing in black plastic nursery pots on your property, you need to get them in the ground fast, first preparing the hole with some compost, and then watering by pushing the hose down deep in the soil and letting the water dribble until water appears on the surface. Do this about every other day until it looks like the tree will survive.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery


Fraxinus velutina

 

 

 

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