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Tuesday - April 06, 2010

From: Durham, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant identification
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

In spot in the garden where tomatoes grew last this year, previous to planting what looks to me like a shamrock plant came up until it bloomed. Now it looks like some of the fuschia plants only the leaves have longer stems than I remember shamrock which bloom white and the color is reddish and sort of orange with yellow inside that hang exposed. It's not fuschia at all. Any ideas???

ANSWER:

Not really!! The Oxalis sp. (woodsorrels) have leaves that look like shamrocks but their flowers don't sound like your description.  In general, it is very difficult to identify a plant just from the description alone. However, if you will take photos and send them to us we will be happy to try to identify your plant.  Please visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page to read instructions on how to submit photos.  Please follow the instructions carefully.
 

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