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Mr. Smarty Plants - Native shrubs to plant after Ashe Juniper removal

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Monday - February 15, 2010

From: New Braunfels, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Native shrubs to plant after Ashe Juniper removal
Answered by: Nina Hawkins

QUESTION:

I live on 7 acres of beautiful Texas Hill Country land just north of New Braunfels. Live oak, Cedar elm, and Ashe juniper dominate the landscape. I have cleared some of the Ashe juniper and would like to plant several native shrubs throughout the seven acres. I have already had some success growing Texas Mountain Laurel and Mexican Buckeye from seed. I would appreciate any suggestions you might have for additional native shrubs which would need to be somewhat deer resistant. Thank you.

ANSWER:

The following shrubs would be right at home on your Hill Country acreage and are purported to be moderately to highly deer resistant.

Ilex vomitoria (yaupon)

Leucophyllum frutescens (Texas barometer bush)

Mahonia trifoliolata (agarita)

Senna lindheimeriana (velvet leaf senna)

Senna roemeriana (twoleaf senna)

Mimosa borealis (fragrant mimosa)

Young plants are especially attractive forage for deer, so you may still want to protect them when more appealing food supplies are low.  You'll find many more suggestions on our Recommended Species page for Central Texas (just narrow your search down to "Shrubs" on the "General Appearance" dropdown menu), but this list should get you off to a good start!

 


Ilex vomitoria

Leucophyllum frutescens

Mahonia trifoliolata

Senna lindheimeriana

Senna roemeriana

Mimosa borealis

 

 

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