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Sunday - December 06, 2009

From: Marshall, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant identfication
Answered by: Nan Hampton


I found a shrub I like because of the black fruit that birds like to eat but I don't know what it is. It looks similar to a blackhaw but the edges of the leaves are smooth not jagged. The fruit is a black velvet soft oval berry. Is it a Viburnum Blackhaw or something else?


Please send us photos of the plant with close ups of the leaves and their arrangement on the branch, a close up of of the fruit and its location on the shrub, and also a photo of the overall plant and we will do our very best to identify it.  Please visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page to read more about the instructions for submitting photos.

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