En EspaŅol
Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Mr. Smarty Plants - Spots on leaves of sevenleaf creeper in Austin

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions
Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.
 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - November 14, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Poisonous Plants, Vines
Title: Spots on leaves of sevenleaf creeper in Austin
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Have 3 seven leaf creepers that are planted in mostly shade. In Sept & Oct 2009 all 3 plants had dried up leaves which fell off; however, all three plants grew new leaves when we got rain and are coming back well. One plant, which gets more shade that the others, has leaves that have turned a paler green with some whitish brown spots. What is this and how do I treat it?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants recently answered another question on Parthenocissus heptaphylla (sevenleaf creeper). When you read this previous answer, note the line about information on the plant: "Because Sevenleaf creeper has a much smaller native range and is a much less well known species, there is simply not as much literature about it." About the best we can do under those circumstances is to find out what might be causing this sort of problem in other members of the genus Parthenocissus. All three like sun, part shade or shade, are native to Texas, and seem to prefer moist soils.

Parthenocissus heptaphylla (sevenleaf creeper) is found on soil underlain with limestone, endemic to Edwards Plateau and Lampasas Cut Plains of Texas.

Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper) - tends to climb using tendrils with adhesive-like tips

Parthenocissus vitacea (woodbine)

Sadly, looking for information on all three plants only yielded the information that it was subject to leaf spots, but not what causes them or what to do about it. Finally, we found a website from Yardener, Problems of Virginia Creeper, that will give you some leads on what might be causing the spots on your species. One more caution: the Virginia Creeper is known to cause very severe allergic reactions on contact for many people. Again, there is not much information on Seven-Leaf Creeper, but better safe than sorry when you handle the vine. 


Parthenocissus heptaphylla

Parthenocissus heptaphylla

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

 

 

More Poisonous Plants Questions

Datura in the state of Washington.
October 09, 2009 - I have a datura species growing beneath my bird feeder. How did it get here in Western Washington?? It has the typical fragrant, tubular flowers & spiky seed pods. It has grown 3' tall & 4' wide. Am...
view the full question and answer

Non-toxic Groundcover for North-Central Texas
April 07, 2011 - I need a creeping ground cover for shade that is non-toxic to dogs. I had planned on Swedish ivy until I read it was toxic. Is Asian jasmine toxic? Or, do you have any suggestions?
view the full question and answer

Identity of poisonous thorn bush in Montgomery Texas
May 29, 2012 - What is the name of a poisonous thorn bush in Montgomery Texas?
view the full question and answer

How to get rid of poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)
April 25, 2007 - Our school grounds are infested with lots of poison ivy. What is best remedy for extensive growth?
view the full question and answer

Are berries from the Carrot Wood Tree toxic to animals?
May 26, 2009 - Hello, I am trying to find out if the berries on the carrot wood tree are toxic to animals - dog?
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP
© 2014 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center