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Tuesday - October 20, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Should I thin my bluebonnet seedlings in Austin, TX
Answered by: Jimmy Mills and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

It is October, and we have hundreds, maybe thousands, of bluebonnets sprouting at Eilers Park. The seeds are from plants we installed last year. They look like they should be thinned. Should we thin them or just let them alone?

ANSWER:

First of all, let me refer you to our "How To" article on growing bluebonnets. Actually, there are three articles, so once you get to the How to Articles page, scroll down the page to the heading; All About Bluebonnets. The three articles there can tell you a lot about growing bluebonnets.

As to thinning bluebonnets, there are two schools of thought here at the Wildflower Center. I am of the opinion that you should leave well enough alone. However, our senior horticulturist, Julie Krosley, says that she has had good success with doing some thinning at this time. In fact, after the first true leaves appear you can carefully dig some out and transplant to areas with no seedlings.


Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

Lupinus texensis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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