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Thursday - October 01, 2009

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Plant identification
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, Ever since we received this (much needed and wonderful) rain in Austin, my gardens and yard are being swamped with these tiny, green clover-like plants. I've never seen it before and now I'm overrun! Any ideas on what it is and how best to control it?

ANSWER:

The plants that come to my mind aren't clovers, but they do have clover-like leaves.  The one plant I have seen in abundance after the rains that has clover-like leaves is Oxalis drummondii (Drummond's woodsorrel).  Since you don't mention that your plant has beautiful pink flowers, I am doubtful that this is what you have seen.  There is a smaller 'cousin' with yellow flowers that are common around Austin as well, Oxalis stricta (common yellow oxalis). If neither of these is the plant you have been seeing, please send us photos and we will do our best to identify the mystery plant.  Visit Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page to read instructions for submitting photos.

 


Oxalis drummondii

Oxalis drummondii

Oxalis stricta

Oxalis stricta

 

 

 

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