Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - September 01, 2009

From: New Providence, NJ
Region: Northeast
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Evergreen shrubs for New Jersey
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Need suggestions for Zone 6; Up to 2-3'H compact; evergreen foundation plants; deer resistant; sunny-partial shade; clay soil conditions. Appreciate your input.

ANSWER:

You can look for appropriate shrubs for New Jersey landscaping by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database by selecting New Jersey from the Select State or Province option and 'Shrub' from the Habit (general appearance) option.  Here are a few evergreen ones that I chose:

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (kinnikinnick).  This one qualifies more as an evergreen groundcover since it reaches only about 1 ft. high.  Here is more information.

Dasiphora fruticosa ssp. floribunda (shrubby cinquefoil) is classified as semi-evergreen.

Juniperus communis var. depressa (common juniper).  Here are photos and more information.

Kalmia angustifolia (sheep laurel).  Here are more photos and information.

Leiophyllum buxifolium (sandmyrtle).  Here is more information.

Mahonia aquifolium (hollyleaved barberry).  Here is more information.

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle).  Be sure to look for the dwarf cultivar.


Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Dasiphora fruticosa ssp. floribunda

Kalmia angustifolia

Leiophyllum buxifolium

Mahonia aquifolium

Morella cerifera

 

 

 

More Shrubs Questions

Non-berrying possumhaw from Austin
June 05, 2014 - I planted a possumhaw 8 to 10 years ago for the beautiful winter color, it has never set berries. I see tiny white flowers along the branches each spring, and always hope this will be the year, but I...
view the full question and answer

Plants for clay soil in Leavenworth IN
October 02, 2009 - I live in south central Indiana; the soil is very bad clay, either hard as a rock or mud. I have made several raised beds but am still having problems with plants rotting. What types of plants work he...
view the full question and answer

Freeze damage to esperanza in pot from Brady TX
December 10, 2009 - My esperanza, currently in a container, has suffered some freeze damage. I have prepared a planting spot for it and am not sure whether to plant now, trim it back if I do plant it, etc. I would appr...
view the full question and answer

Replacing non-native boxwood in Austin
October 03, 2011 - I have a large maze garden, possibly boxwood, originally planted in the 1950's, in Austin, Texas. About 1/3 of it has died out, probably due to drought, heat and age. Should I attempt to replant ju...
view the full question and answer

Trees for Privacy Screening in Central Texas
July 11, 2016 - I live in Cedar Park, Texas and have a neighbor who likes to have parties. I need a evergreen tree/hedge that will provide privacy and sound barrier. We have some wax myrtles but they don't work. We ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.