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Tuesday - September 01, 2009

From: New Providence, NJ
Region: Northeast
Topic: Shrubs
Title: Evergreen shrubs for New Jersey
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Need suggestions for Zone 6; Up to 2-3'H compact; evergreen foundation plants; deer resistant; sunny-partial shade; clay soil conditions. Appreciate your input.

ANSWER:

You can look for appropriate shrubs for New Jersey landscaping by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database by selecting New Jersey from the Select State or Province option and 'Shrub' from the Habit (general appearance) option.  Here are a few evergreen ones that I chose:

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (kinnikinnick).  This one qualifies more as an evergreen groundcover since it reaches only about 1 ft. high.  Here is more information.

Dasiphora fruticosa ssp. floribunda (shrubby cinquefoil) is classified as semi-evergreen.

Juniperus communis var. depressa (common juniper).  Here are photos and more information.

Kalmia angustifolia (sheep laurel).  Here are more photos and information.

Leiophyllum buxifolium (sandmyrtle).  Here is more information.

Mahonia aquifolium (hollyleaved barberry).  Here is more information.

Morella cerifera (wax myrtle).  Be sure to look for the dwarf cultivar.


Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

Dasiphora fruticosa ssp. floribunda

Kalmia angustifolia

Leiophyllum buxifolium

Mahonia aquifolium

Morella cerifera

 

 

 

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