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Mr. Smarty Plants - Transplanting birdwing passionflower in Canyon, TX

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Friday - April 17, 2009

From: Canyon Lake, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Propagation, Transplants
Title: Transplanting birdwing passionflower in Canyon, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

First, thank you for all your help! Second, I have two bird-wing passionflowers that are growing next to the house. I'd like to move them because this is the area where I want to put in some raised beds. Do you have any tips on moving them so that I don't do too much damage? And where would be a good place? Will they grow up a live oak? or do they need somethings smaller?

ANSWER:

Passiflora tenuiloba (birdwing passionflower) is native to your part of Texas and likes to have part shade.  It spreads by suckering, and can climb over boulders or into small shrubs, but we don't think it would be a good idea to encourage it to grow up a live oak. We found an excellent article, "In The Grow,"  on transplanting vines, especially clematis, from the Purdue University Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. An excerpt is quoted below:

"Transplant the vines in early spring before much growth occurs. First, to make transplanting more manageable, cut the vines back so only several feet of top growth remain. Clematis can usually be cut back to the ground, but I suggest leaving some of the vine in place so you can see which shoots have survived. Dig the roots out carefully. Try to dig a ball large enough to hold together so you maintain soil contact with the roots. Take great care not to break the woody stem where it joins the roots. Sometimes the vine will still come up from the roots, but you have a better chance of success if you don't break the shoot."

According to this, it may be a little late this year to do the transplanting, but if you are in a hurry, you can go ahead and give it a try, but don't wait until it gets any hotter. 


Passiflora tenuiloba

Passiflora tenuiloba

Passiflora tenuiloba

Passiflora tenuiloba

 

 

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