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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Tuesday - March 10, 2009

From: Dripping Springs, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Wildflowers
Title: Root lengths of Central Texas wildflowers
Answered by: Barbara Medford and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I'm looking for lengths of the roots of wildflowers of Central Texas. It would be particularly helpful to know the really long ones. Any native prairie flowers or grasses would do.

ANSWER:

Sorry, but there is no definitive answer to your question. So far as we are able to determine, there is no list or database on root lengths of any plants, including natives. The root length of any plant is variable, depending on the plant size, genetics and age as well as environmental conditions. If you or someone else would like to do the research and prepare such a list, we would be delighted to include it in the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Native Plant Information Network database.

 

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