En Español

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - September 02, 2008

From: San Antonio, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Poisonous Plants
Title: Curing plant rash
Answered by: Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

I went walking in the woods a few weeks ago, and my leg swiped some kind of cactus or something. It scratched me up and I had to remove little white spines with tweezers. I developed an intensely itchy rash that three weeks later is just as bad as when it first happened. It is not poison ivy or anything.. I have no idea what it is and it is not getting any better. I tried using Tea Tree oil and Shea oil.. it helps a little but has not cured the problem. I don't want to take any pharmaceutical drugs. Do you know how I can resolve this naturally?

ANSWER:

We don't think we can answer your question since giving medical advice is not really in our province, but it seems that after three weeks you might want to consult with a medical doctor.  However, we may be able to help you identify the cause.  If the offending plant was a cactus, it was likely Cylindropuntia leptocaulis (Christmas cactus), also known as Pencil cactus or Tasajillo.  Other possible offenders include Urtica chamaedryoides (heartleaf nettle), Cnidoscolus texanus (Texas bullnettle), and Tragia spp, (Noseburn). A less likely candidate (because it's not native to that area but occurs not too far away) is Cevallia sinuata (stinging serpent),  Finally, any number of insects with stining hairs, including saddleback caterpillars and stinging asps may have assaulted you.

 

From the Image Gallery


Texas bullnettle
Cnidoscolus texanus

Branched noseburn
Tragia ramosa

Stinging serpent
Cevallia sinuata

Tasajillo
Cylindropuntia leptocaulis

Betonyleaf noseburn
Tragia betonicifolia

More Poisonous Plants Questions

Smarty Plants on staghorn sumac
May 23, 2005 - I currently have staghorn sumac in my yard located in Woodstock, Connecticut. it appears to be of the Rhus typhina species. i am removing these from my yard using a chainsaw and creating a pile of ...
view the full question and answer

Plants to replace poison ivy and brush
June 23, 2008 - I am right next to a highway in Paradise, CA 95969. I am having brush and poison oak removed in that area and want to plant something fast growing and draught resistant. I am thinking about Oleander...
view the full question and answer

Muhlenbergia dumosa safe for horses from Austin
May 13, 2014 - Is Muhlenbergia dumosa safe for horses? Will horses eat it? I have a client who has a mini-horse who visits her property on occasion, and I want to ensure that what I plant is both safe for the hors...
view the full question and answer

Grasses for horses in Austin
October 27, 2012 - Hello Mr. Smarty Plants We just bought 4.5 acres in Travis County off HWY 290. We have 3 horses we keep on it but there is very little grass in the pastures. What is the best type of grass to seed ...
view the full question and answer

Poisonous thorn in Marion NC
May 16, 2010 - Yesterday my son got a thorn stuck in his foot. I removed it but his foot is still swollen and puffy today. What kind of plants have poisonous thorns?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.
E-NEWSLETTER | BECOME A MEMBER | DONATE NOW | MEDIA | SITEMAP | STAFF
© 2016 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center