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Tuesday - May 27, 2008

From: Bayport, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Vines
Title: Evergreen vine for New York
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I live on long island. I live on a corner piece of property and we have a 4 foot picket fence. We have some deciduous bushes planted along the fence, but would like a little more privacy because we just put in a pool. I do not want to rip out the existing bushes (purple sand cherry, rose of sharon) but would like to plant an evergreen vine to grow on the fence. I want it to grow on the fence and give us a little more privacy all year long. I would also like the vine to produce flowers, if possible. Any ideas???

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants regrets that there is only one evergreen vine native to New York, Lonicera sempervirens (trumpet honeysuckle) and it is described as semi-evergreen. This means that it is usually evergreen in the south and can be evergreen further north depending on the severity of the winter. it will grow in New York, but the bottom line is that I don't think you can count on it being evergreen there.

You don't say what the available light is along the fence; but if your fence is in partial shade, you might consider planting ferns under or beside your existing deciduous shrubs. They could fill in the spaces between your trees and add some winter privacy. Here are several ferns that grow in partial shade, are evergreen, and reach heights of 3-6 feet.

Dryopteris cristata (crested woodfern)

Dryopteris marginalis (marginal woodfern)

Polystichum acrostichoides (Christmas fern)


Dryopteris cristata

Dryopteris marginalis

Polystichum acrostichoides


Lonicera sempervirens

Lonicera sempervirens

 

 

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