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Saturday - April 19, 2008

From: Round Rock, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Compost and Mulch, Turf, Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Native buffalograss in sandy loam
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I am in the Austin area and want to plant Native Texas Buffalo Grass in sandy loam from the Colorado River bed. Will this work?

ANSWER:

As you can see from this webpage on Bouteloua dactyloides (buffalograss), sandy loam is one of the soils that buffalograss grows in. This article from our How-To section on Native Lawns:Buffalograss will give you more information on the cultivation and care of this native grass. You will note that it says buffalograss does not thrive in sandy soils, but it goes on to say it needs rich, well-drained soil. If you have the opportunity before you actually plant your grass, you might try mixing in some humus such as compost. This not only adds nutrients to the soil, but should improve its texture. We would especially recommend that you take note of the necessity of watering when the buffalograss is first established, and keeping weeds pulled out, eliminating as many weeds as possible before planting the grass. If you are planting by seed, now is the time to get going, as our temperatures are beginning to go up. Sod can be planted any time of the years, but this is going to be less cost-efficient.


Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

Bouteloua dactyloides

 

 

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