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Sunday - December 16, 2007

From: The Woodlands, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Information about Lemon Cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa)
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Lately, I've been seeing references to a tree/shrub called a "lemon cypress tree". It looks like a standard Italian cypress, but the foilage is yellow. I cannot find any reference to this plant except in expensive cut flower catalogs. Do you know what it is and if nurseries are carrying it in Texas?

ANSWER:

The Lemon Cypress is a cultivar called Goldcrest, or Golden Crest, of Cupressus macrocarpa (Monterey cypress). It is a native of California.  Here is more information about the Monterey cypress from the USDA Plants Database and from Floridata.com

It is possible that some Texas nurseries carry it, but since it is a miniature cultivar they are not too likely to offer it for a bargain price. You can search for nurseries in your area that specialize in native plants in our National Suppliers Directory. A Google search on "Lemon Cypress" results in numerous companies offering the plant for sale.

 

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