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Monday - August 20, 2007

From: Pflugerville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Inland sea oats as backfrop for pigeon berry
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am thinking of using inland sea oats as a backdrop for pigeon berry (Rivina humilis) in a shady area along my foundation. Will this combination work, or will the sea oats outcompete the pigeon berry?

ANSWER:

Chasmanthium latifolium (Inland seaoats) does have a way of taking over, but you might get this to work if you have a large area. If you plant the sea oats near the wall and the Rivina humilis (pigeon-berry) 2 to 3 feet in front of it, it should make a nice border in the spring and summer. The sea oats will still be attractive when they turn brown in the winter, but you may have to cut them back or dig some of them up each spring to keep them from taking completely over.

 


Chasmanthium latifolium

Rivina humilis
 

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