Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Sunday - August 11, 2013

From: Ekron, KY
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Plant Identification, Vines
Title: Identity of vine growing in Kentucky.
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a vine I can't identify. The leaf is heart shaped and the vine is fuzzy. The blooms is just now starting to bloom. They are small red and some white in it. The bloom sort of remind you of a carnation bud. It's not a solid one bud. It is approximately 7 feet tall and wrapped around the light pole. I hope you can help me. Thank you.

ANSWER:

You can search for your vine by doing a COMBINATION SEARCH in our Native Plant Database.  Choose "Kentucky" from Select State or Province, "Vine" from Habit (general appearance) and  "White","Pink" and "Red" (all three) from Bloom Color.  You should try the search yourself to be sure I haven't missed your vine, but here are some possibilities I found:

Apios americana (Groundnut)

Mikania scandens (Climbing hempvine)

Polygonum arifolium (Halberdleaf tearthumb)  Here are photos and more information from Connecticut Wildflowers.

Strophostyles helvola (Amberique-bean)  Here are more photos and information from Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia.

Strophostyles umbellata (Pink fuzzybean)  Here are more photos and information from Southeastern Flora.

All the above plants are native to North America (north of Mexico).  I can think of another vine with heart-shaped, somewhat fuzzy leaves and pinkish or reddish flowers that is NOT native to North America, but to Mexico and Central America.  It is Antigonon leptopus (Coral vine or Queen's wreath).  I think it would probably grow for a season in Kentucky but I don't believe it would overwinter.  Its USDA Plant Hardiness Zones are 8-10 and Kentucky is in Zones 6-7a.

If none of the vines above are your vine and you have (or can take) photos of it, please visit our Plant Identification page to find links to several plant identification forums that will accept photos of plants for identification.  Be sure to read the "Important Notes" for submitting images near the bottom of the page.

 

From the Image Gallery


Groundnut
Apios americana

Groundnut
Apios americana

Groundnut
Apios americana

Climbing hempvine
Mikania scandens

Climbing hempvine
Mikania scandens

Trailing fuzzybean
Strophostyles helvola

Trailing fuzzybean
Strophostyles helvola

Pink fuzzybean
Strophostyles umbellata

Pink fuzzybean
Strophostyles umbellata

More Plant Identification Questions

Identification of plant, probably Eryngium leavenworthii (Leavenworths eryngo)
October 26, 2007 - burr like bloom shaped like small pineapple,purple in color,grows in a cluster on single stem,dries well
view the full question and answer

Book for identifying Texas plants by dichotomous key from Seguin TX
October 12, 2009 - What is the best book(s) for identifying Texas plants using a dichotomous key?
view the full question and answer

A stinging plant in Moultrie, GA?
April 28, 2010 - Mr. Smarty Plants, I was walking along in my lawn in some flip-flops and my foot barely grazed my ankle. As soon as it had happened, I felt this horrible pain, like a million tiny, invisible splinter...
view the full question and answer

What is a Demaree Rose?
August 14, 2013 - Have been told the Apache Plume is the Wild Rose after which the Wild Rose Pass north of Ft. Davis was named. However, other research indicates it was the Demaree Rose. What is true and are there ...
view the full question and answer

Wildflowers that grow in woodlands
June 22, 2011 - Please tell me the names of wildflowers that grow under your oak trees in Texas. I am only familiar with those open meadow plants, not those that live under the deciduous trees. Thank you for your t...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.