Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Tuesday - March 12, 2013

From: Branchburg, NJ
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Non-Natives, Propagation, Edible Plants
Title: Edibility of non-native garlic sprouts from Brancburg, NJ
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I have regular garlic in my refrigerator. It had sprouts growing out of it so I put it in a cup of water. Now that the stems are large enough to put in food, my question is.. Is that part of the garlic edible?

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Garden, home of Mr. Smarty Plants, is committed to the growth, propagation and protection of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which it is being grown, in your case, Somerset County, NJ. Allium sativum (Garlic) in the onion family, is native to Central Asia, and therefore falls out of our area of expertise.

From an article from the Boundary Garlic Farm  - Growing Garlic - we found a great deal of information on the cultivation and propagation of garlic, but no indication whatever than any portion of the plant was toxic. Whether it would taste good or not is another question, but we don't believe you would be at any risk at trying it.

 

More Non-Natives Questions

Splitting bark on non-native mimosa from Buda TX
June 24, 2012 - What would cause my Mimosa tree to have splitting bark. I've only lived in this house for 8 months and am learning about this tree. The other tree seems fine. It looks as though it split and then ...
view the full question and answer

Growing conditions for non-native Thlaspi caerulescens
June 19, 2007 - I want to know what is the best condition for growing Thlaspi caerulescens and what is its life span. Thanks
view the full question and answer

Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)
July 02, 2014 - Foxglove (digitalis purpurea) is not a native U.S. plant. It was introduced to the U.S. from Europe and is now considered invasive in many parts of the western U.S. It invades our forested wild land...
view the full question and answer

Cutting back of non-native Salvia Elegans in Portland OR
December 31, 2011 - I did not trim back my pineapple sage in the fall. It is now winter and the plants are bare sticks. Should I cut them back or leave them alone?
view the full question and answer

Seeds of agave attenuata from San Diego CA
April 16, 2012 - After the agave attenuata bloom dried up there are seeds like thing hanging on the foxtail; do I leave it until it dies or do I chop that down. Are those seeds for propagation. The leaves of the plan...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.