Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Thursday - February 07, 2013

From: Denham Springs, LA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Water Gardens, Shrubs, Trees
Title: Tree with stilt roots for Louisiana bog garden
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Does Louisiana have any native trees with stilt roots? I would like one to go with my cypress and tupelo bog garden. I have several native plants such as spider lilies and blue flag irises, but I'm still missing that one oddball plant to complete it. Do you have any suggestions?

ANSWER:

Avicennia germinans (Black mangrove) does have pneumatophores (stilt roots) and does occur as close to you as Jefferson Parish on Lake Ponchartrain.

Here is more information from the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, Florida and an excellent Plant Guide for the species from the National Resources Conservation Services of the USDA.  Since it is a facultative halophyte (tolerates growing in saline water but will grow well in fresh water), you should be able to grow it in your bog garden.

Here are photos of the black mangrove from DiscoverLife.com and Seabean.com.

Another possibility (without stilt roots, however) is Cephalanthus occidentalis (Common buttonbush).  It grows in boggy areas and is rather spectacular looking with its white flower balls and, later, reddish-brown fruits.

 

From the Image Gallery


Common buttonbush
Cephalanthus occidentalis

Common buttonbush
Cephalanthus occidentalis

More Water Gardens Questions

Native plants for a littoral zone in Fort Myers, Florida
June 05, 2009 - Dear Mr. Smarty Plants, What native plants would you recommend for the littoral zone on a pond in Fort Myers Florida? Damon's Mom
view the full question and answer

Source for Saltmarsh cordgrass from Houston
April 16, 2013 - I work for a consulting firm and we are looking to do more of our wetland creation/restoration. Do you know where one can purchased Spartina alterniflora?
view the full question and answer

Winter tank pond care in Austin Texas
November 09, 2010 - Suggestions for winterizing a water garden in Austin Texas. Water contained in a 60 gallon aluminum horse tank. Garden contains papyrus, horsetail and water lily. There are no fish in the pond and no...
view the full question and answer

Overwintering a Juncus effusus in Great Neck, NY
October 23, 2008 - Can I over winter a juncus effusus spiralis indoors or must it be kept outdoors? Whether indoors or outdoors, what is the proper way to keep it alive during the winter months?
view the full question and answer

Plants for under a fountain splash line in California
January 29, 2009 - What plants should we plant under our fountain's splash line in our Mediterranean style courtyard? The area will get wet from the fountain's splashing and have "full" sun. We are on a rock ridge...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.