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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Tuesday - January 15, 2013

From: Los Angeles, CA
Region: California
Topic: Non-Natives, Watering, Edible Plants, Trees
Title: Water requirements for fruit trees in California
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

Dear Sir; In which of these options (fruit trees) the need for watering in irrigation process is higher than the others: -Olive tree -Nectarines and peaches trees -Hazelnut trees -Pistachios and Almonds trees Thank you.

ANSWER:

Our focus and expertise are with plants native to North America.  Here is our mission statement:

"The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes."

Of the trees you name above, only Corylus cornuta var. californica (California hazelnut) is native to California and North America. Peaches and nectarines (Prunus persica) are of Asian origins; almonds (Prunus dulcis) are native to the Middle East and northern Africa; pistachios (Pistacia vera) originated in Asia; and the olive (Olea europaea) comes from the Mediterranean and northern Africa.

Your questions would be better answered by the Los Angeles County office of the University of California Cooperative Extension Service.  They should be able to supply you with the answers you need.

 

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