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Wednesday - March 30, 2011

From: Valley View, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Shade Tolerant
Title: North-central Texas shrubs for part-shade
Answered by: Janice Kvale

QUESTION:

I need a shrub that will be OK in shade (2-3 hrs a day max.), in fairly well-drained soil, will grow to around 8 ft. tall and 4-6 wide, for the region between Denton and Gainesville. If it flowers, all the better. Thanks, DH

ANSWER:

Some shrubs are quite happy with any amount of light, any type of soil, and any amount of moisture (that's why native plants are so suited for landscaping with limited maintenance!). Most also attract butterflies and birds. All of the suggestions below are pleased with part-shade (2-6 hours shade daily), commercially available except as noted, and fall somewhere in the vicinity of your size specifications. Find out where you may be able to purchase the shrub at this link. Be sure you check out the specifics of each shrub you are considering on our Plant Database by entering the name where indicated or just click on the hyperlinked name below.

Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii (Turk's cap or turkscap): Attractive red flowers, on the shorter side of 8 ft.

Vaccinium corymbosum (Highbush blueberry): Produces edible berries.

Morella cerifera (Wax myrtle): Great screening plant popular for landscapes.

Rhus aromatica (Fragrant sumac): Fragrant, sprawling and fast growing.

Lindera benzoin (Northern spicebush): Tiny, yellow and aromatic flowers, red fruit, fast growing.

Forestiera pubescens (Stretchberry): Flowers are not showy but attract birds and butterflies. May or may not be commercially available.

Elaeagnus commutata (Silverberry/wild olive): Fast growing and long lived with tiny scented flowers. Forms patches of suckers.

Amorpha fruticosa (Indigo bush): Fine textured foliage on upper part of plant; blue to purple blossoms.


Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii




Morella cerifera


Rhus aromatica


Lindera benzoin


Forestiera pubescens


Elaeagnus commutata


Amorpha fruticosa

 

 

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