Rent Shop Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - February 10, 2011

From: Graford, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Identification of low growing plants with flowers that resemble a bunch of grapes in Graford, TX
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I am in northwest TX and I would like to know the name of the early blooming, very low growing plant that has a single bloom on a bare stem--it is dark crimson and the blooms looks like a bunch of grapes. It blooms about the same time that the lily of the valley blooms.

ANSWER:

A little searching based on your description leads to the genus Muscari, sometimes called Grape Hyacinth. This is a genus introduced from Eurasia, and as such falls outside our area of focus which is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.

I've included a couple of links to help you determine the name of the plant that you have, and to learn about its care.

Theplantexpert.com

Pacifficbulbsociety.org

I didn't find any mention of crimson flowers in the the descriptions that I read. If after looking at these two sites you are still unsure of the name of the plant, I encourage you to go to our Plant Identification Page  to avail yourself of the Plant Identification Forums that are listed there.

 

 

 

More Plant Identification Questions

Plant identification
July 07, 2010 - This should be an easy one. I would like to identify a plant that grows along river banks, usually up to the edge of the water and within 50' of water course, and is very common. It is up to 8' in ...
view the full question and answer

Plant identfication
August 15, 2009 - I have this strange bright orangey-red plant growing in my yard that I have never seen before. It's about 3 inches tall that comes to a point on top and is hollow inside and very soft? What could i...
view the full question and answer

Identifying a plant/weed blooming in Feb. in Texas
February 24, 2010 - Can you help me identify a flowering plant I have found growing in my yard? It is a tiny green plant most months of the year, with very tiny deep to pastel blue flowers on it in early spring ( it is i...
view the full question and answer

Identification of tree along Austin highways
April 01, 2011 - I am trying to identify a large tree seen along many Austin Highways. The best ID can find is Western Soapberry, but the articles all specify white blooms. The trees I see have purple clusters of bloo...
view the full question and answer

Non-blooming orange bell plant
June 15, 2008 - My orange bell plant is not blooming. I live in Central Texas where it is hot. The plant has part sun, part shade. Is there any way to help it bloom?
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.