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Tuesday - August 03, 2010

From: New York, NY
Region: Northeast
Topic: Rain Gardens
Title: Plants for a bioswale in New York City
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I am interested in learning about the best vegetation for planting in a bioswale in New York City. Can you help? Thanks!

ANSWER:

Bioswales, or rain gardens, require plants that must be able to tolerate growing in standing water, but also need to be able to thrive when the water dries up.  Below are some that should work in your New York City bioswale.  Since I don't know the other aspects of your site, such as how much sunlight it gets, you should check the GROWING CONDITIONS on each of the species pages to see if they are compatible with those of your site. 

Grasses/Grass-like

Andropogon glomeratus (bushy bluestem)

Carex stipata (owlfruit sedge)

Calamagrostis canadensis (bluejoint)

Perennials

Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed)

Chelone glabra (white turtlehead)

Hibiscus moscheutos (crimsoneyed rosemallow)

Monarda didyma (scarlet beebalm)

Ferns

Athyrium filix-femina (common ladyfern)

Osmunda cinnamomea (cinnamon fern)

Shrubs

Cephalanthus occidentalis (common buttonbush)

Physocarpus opulifolius (common ninebark)

Clethra alnifolia (coastal sweetpepperbush)

Here are photos from our Image Gallery:


Andropogon glomeratus

Carex stipata

Calamagrostis canadensis

Asclepias incarnata

Chelone glabra

Hibiscus moscheutos

Monarda didyma

Athyrium filix-femina

Osmunda cinnamomea

Cephalanthus occidentalis

Physocarpus opulifolius

Clethra alnifolia

 

 

 

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