Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Monday - January 09, 2006

From: San Francisco, CA
Region: California
Topic: Invasive Plants
Title: About Salvia superba
Answered by: Nan Hampton and Joe Marcus

QUESTION:

About 10 years ago, nurseries were offering a small salvia, called salvia superba or meadow sage. A few years later, "May Night" and "Blue Hill" appeared on the market similar to this first salvia superba but both were taller (salvia superba gets to 12"). I am trying to find a correct identification for this shorter salvia for an article on drought tolerant plants. Thank you.

ANSWER:

Salvia x superba Stapf [sylvestris x villicaulis] (synonym Salvia virgata) is an introduced species. Non-native plants are not really in our purview; however, I will suggest a couple of web sites that might help you find some clarification. One is for 'May Night' Meadow Sage which is listed as either Salvia x sylvestris or S. x superba. There certainly does seem to be confusion about the proper botanical name. Another web site has links to several people doing research on the genus Salvia.

You should be aware that S. x superba (S. virgata) is on the "A" list of noxious weeds in California. The statement for "A" reads: "Eradication, containment, rejection, or other holding action at the state-county level. Quarantine interceptions to be rejected or treated at any point in the state." The California Department of Food and Agriculture gives more information about Meadow Sage (S. virgata). It doesn't sound like something you would want to recommend to be used as a drought tolerant plant.
 

More Invasive Plants Questions

Removing bermudagrass from buffalograss in Smithville TX
May 01, 2013 - I have a lawn created two years ago with buffalo grass sod in Smithville, TX. Recently several areas of bermudagrass have started to flourish in the buffalo grass lawn. Can you recommend a herbicide...
view the full question and answer

Is Jerusalem thorn native to Central Texas?
July 17, 2009 - I was reading about Retama (Parkinsonia aculeata) which is native to South America and naturalized throughout Texas and the southern US. I also read that it is considered an invasive plant species in...
view the full question and answer

Non-native, invasive Asiatic Jasmine from Austin
October 25, 2012 - Is Trachelospermum asiaticum considered a native texas plant? Is there an example growing at the Center that can be viewed?
view the full question and answer

Brown, dry leaves on weeping willow tree
May 01, 2008 - We live in central TX and have just planted a weeping willow tree. Our back yard has a retention pond and ravine that parallels our property and we were told that the weeping willow will do perfectly ...
view the full question and answer

Can bastard cabbage be eaten from Austin
May 02, 2013 - On a local cooking show they were talking about cooking local foods and mentioned bastard cabbage but never showed how to cook it or if it was in fact edible. Would be a way to help get rid of it if ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.