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A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Sunday - October 18, 2009

From: Hunt, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Trees
Title: Chilopsis linearis Bubba in Hunt TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I purchased 3 desert willows (label: chilopsis linearis) to create an oasis area around a fountain which is in the center of my circle drive. But I need one more. Now I can only find the "chilopsis linearis bubba" variety. Since they're all to be planted close to each other, will the bubba variety stand out as different from the other three? It appeared to me that the bubba variety has shorter/darker green leaves..and I'm not sure what else might be "different". My options: wait to find a match, or get two bubbas and mix two and two? What would you do? Thanks.

ANSWER:

The cultivar (cultivated variety) of Chilopsis linearis (desert willow) 'Bubba' is very little different from the native variety. There will be no damage done by having them grow together in a garden. In fact, the 'Bubba' cultivar ordinarily produces no seed pods, so you won't have to worry about cross pollination. Whether you have all of one species or mix them up is pretty much a matter of personal preference. Personally, we prefer the more natural look of mixing them up, letting them look like they just "grew that way." And we also have a personal preference for an odd number of plants when there is a grouping, 3 or 5, and so forth. But, it's your garden, you just decide what you like, you're in charge.

From our Native Plant Image Gallery:


Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

Chilopsis linearis

 

 

 

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