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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Tuesday - July 21, 2009

From: Belmont, MA
Region: Northeast
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Identification of all-white small plants growing in the woods in Belmont, MA.
Answered by: Jimmy Mills

QUESTION:

I have just seen a group of completely ALL-WHITE small plants growing in the woods. They have 4-8in. stalks with a kind of bell-shaped flower growing at the top. There is no green anywhere on this plant. Are they some type of albino plant? How can I begin to figure out what they are? Thanks!

ANSWER:

These are interesting plants, and someone in Pennsylvania has asked about some that were found there. Since its summertime and the living is easy here in Texas, I'm going to refer you to the answer to that question.
 

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