Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Thursday - June 11, 2009

From: Greensboro, NC
Region: Southeast
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Care for non-native mandevilla in Greensboro, NC
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

I bought two potted mandevilla vines last year and read on a website for winter care to cut the vine back at least a foot from the soil. However this spring going into summer it has barely produced anything except for a few leaves. It appears to be healthy and I lightly fertilized both in early spring. They were beautiful last year growing on triangular vine posts, but I'm afraid by doing what the website said they won't bloom this year. Any ideas?

ANSWER:

The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is dedicated to the care and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the area in which they are being grown. According to this University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service website Mandevilla senderi originated in Brazil and is therefore out of our range of expertise. It is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 10 and 11; Greensboro is in Zone 7a to 7b, and this tropical plant would not be hardy outside in your area. Possibly digging it up and potting it so it can be brought inside in the winter will permit it to survive.
 

More Non-Natives Questions

Alternatives to non-native, invasive Pampa grass
August 11, 2006 - Could you please tell me if Cortaderia Selloana is "zone 4" hardy? Also how to start Opuntia Humifusa from cuttings? Do I let them stand upright dry and with no soil until they form the callous? Ple...
view the full question and answer

Height of non-native gardenias
May 29, 2006 - How tall does a gardenia tree get?
view the full question and answer

Sticky leaves on non-native weeping willow
August 03, 2008 - Our weeping willow trees look healthy but have sticky leaves that attach to everything. They sparkle/shine from this very sticky mess. They are watered regularly, are they getting too much water? ...
view the full question and answer

Elaeagnus sudden death in Waxahachie, TX
May 11, 2015 - I live in North Central Texas and have eleagnus planted along my fence in full sun. Last year one dropped all it's leafs and died. The same is happening to one beside it this year. I have sprayed ...
view the full question and answer

Lilac bush roots dangerous to house foundations
August 06, 2008 - Are lilac bushes dangerous to the foundation of a house? There is a lovely white-blooming lilac that grows against the house outside my bedroom window. My ex-husband said that the roots would destro...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.