Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Wednesday - May 06, 2009

From: Ironwood, MI
Region: Midwest
Topic: Deer Resistant
Title: Prunus subhirtella deer resistance in Ironwood MI
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Is the double flowering prunus pendula subhirtella deer "food"?

ANSWER:

Prunus subhirtella 'Pendula" is native to Japan, and therefore out of the range of expertise of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. We are committed to the care, protection and propagation of plants native not only to North America but to the areas in which they are being grown. Natives to an area will require less water, fertilizer and maintenance. In our Deer Resistant Species, which of course is all native plants, we found two members of the Prunus genus, Prunus minutiflora (Texas almond), which was shown to have high deer resistance, and Prunus minutiflora (Texas almond), which had no information on its deer resistance. Members of the Prunus genus, except for the flesh and skin of the fruits, contain hydrocyanic acid, so perhaps the deer have learned to leave them alone, we don't know. You can read this USDA Forest Service website Prunus subhirtella 'Pendula' for more information. Another caution on using this tree: the USDA Plant Profile for it does not show the tree growing in Gogebic County at all. Perhaps this is due to the fact that, on the westermost point of Michigan, you are in USDA Plant Hardiness Zones 3b (average annual minimum temperatures -40 to -35 deg. F) to Zone 4a (-30 to -25).

 

More Deer Resistant Questions

Deer resistant groundcover for Tampa, Florida
June 06, 2009 - I live in Tampa, FL and have a deer problem. I was wondering if you would give me some suggestions for deer resistant ground covers that are hearty and flower but most of all "DEER RESISTANT"!!! ...
view the full question and answer

How to protect roses from deer browsing
July 04, 2012 - I would like to plant knock out roses but I am concerned the deer will eat them? Advice?
view the full question and answer

Deer eating creosote bushes (Larrea tridentata)
November 04, 2008 - We have Creosote Bushes (Larrea tridentata) that grow wild on out 10 acres. The deer eat those plants all year 'round. Probably more in the dry times of the year. Just wanted to let you know that t...
view the full question and answer

What plants are the most deer resistant in Connecticut?
May 13, 2009 - Please advise me as to what plants are the most deer resistant and native to Wilton, CT. Most importantly, what evergreen shrubs and perennials will best survive?
view the full question and answer

Deer-resistant ground covers
November 29, 2007 - Are there any deer resistant ground covers? Our asiatic jasmine has been eaten up by the deer.
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.