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Wednesday - November 12, 2008

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Compost and Mulch, Shade Tolerant, Shrubs
Title: Necessary sun exposure for Eves Necklace
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

How little sun can the tree Eve's Necklace receive and still be happy and healthy? I have an intended spot that gets about 3, maybe 4 hours, some of that will be hot afternoon sun in the summer. The term "part sun" is somewhat ambiguous. I am finding it necessary to research each individual plant and hope for anecdotal information to get it right. Thanks for your help.

ANSWER:

Styphnolobium affine (Eve's necklacepod) has a light requirement of part shade. We consider Sun to be 6 or more hours of sun a day, Part Shade to be 2 to 6 hours of sun per day, and Shade to be less than 2 hours of sun per day, so your 3 to 4 hours of sunlight should be sufficient. Please note that this plant must have good drainage to survive. It's a good idea to prepare the hole in advance, working in some compost, leaf mould or other organic material to contribute to good drainage. If good drainage is not provided, the plant will typically get chlorotic, leaves turning pale green, and fail to thrive, or even to survive. It is a perennial, deciduous plant, growing from 12 to 36 feet in height. It should be grown alone; if there are larger plants nearby, it will become spindly. 


Styphnolobium affine

Styphnolobium affine

Styphnolobium affine

Styphnolobium affine

 

 

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