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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
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Wednesday - October 22, 2008

From: Rockmart, GA
Region: Southeast
Topic: Plant Identification
Title: Tree with bright green seeds the size of a softball
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

My daughter has moved to Taylorsville,Ga and thier are trees that drop bright green seed pods that are round and the size of a soft ball. The outer skin resembles a human brain. Do you have any idea what this is?

ANSWER:

Mr. Smarty Plants thinks that this sounds like Maclura pomifera (osage orange).  If this is not your daughter's tree, please send us photos and we'll do our best to identify it.  Visit the Ask Mr. Smarty Plants' Plant Identification page for instructions on submitting photos.

Maclura pomifera

Maclura pomifera

Maclura pomifera

Maclura pomifera

 

 

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