Host an Event Volunteer Join Tickets

Support the plant database you love!

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
1 rating

Thursday - October 09, 2008

From: Mattapoisett, MA
Region: Northeast
Topic: Propagation
Title: Propagating mimosa from seed
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I have a seed pod from a Mimosa tree. What is the best way to start this beautiful tree from seed. Thank you!

ANSWER:

There are mimosa plants (Genus Mimosa) that are native to North America, but I suspect you are referring to the non-native, invasive mimosa, also called silk tree (Albizia julibrissin).  Our expertise is in the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.  Because the mimosa is invasive we would urge you not to propagate its seed.  We would encourage you to consider a substitue for it—for example, Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud), Cornus alternifolia (alternateleaf dogwood), Cornus florida (flowering dogwood), Cornus sericea (redosier dogwood), Kalmia latifolia (mountain laurel), Rhododendron calendulaceum (flame azalea), Rhus copallinum (winged sumac) or Sorbus americana (American mountain ash).

Cercis canadensis

Cornus alternifolia

Cornus florida

Cornus sericea

Kalmia latifolia

Rhododendron calendulaceum

Rhus copallinum

Sorbus americana

 

 

 

 

More Propagation Questions

Plants for Daisy Girl Scout native plants project
December 13, 2013 - Hello, I am a daisy Girl Scout leader and we are working on one of our Journeys and Native Plants Patch Program which requires our group of 5-6 year old girls to plant and care for a mini-garden. ...
view the full question and answer

No female, hence, no squash.
September 07, 2008 - This is not a wild flower but. My grandchildren left a squash outside in a corner of a flower bed. This spring it grew. There are only male flowers, many of them, but no female, hence, no squash. Why...
view the full question and answer

Transplanting Mexican bonebract in Floresville, TX
November 12, 2008 - My kids and I finally identified a small plant that we found growing in our pasture. There was only one and it is lovely. It is the Mexican Bonebract. What I am interested in finding out is how to tra...
view the full question and answer

Long term storam of Lupinus arboreus seeds
July 21, 2007 - Hi - I was wondering what the best way to store lupine seeds (for long-term storage and maximum viability) is? I am a graduate student at Berkeley studying Lupinus arboreus. We have been storing seeds...
view the full question and answer

Problems with philodendron bipinnatifidum
July 08, 2008 - I have a philodendron bipinnatifidum (selloum) that is now over 20 years old. It has been growing like crazy for the past 2 months, but has been inundated with pests since January, when I repotted it ...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.