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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Thursday - July 10, 2008

From: Phoenix, AZ
Region: Southwest
Topic: Non-Natives
Title: Information about non-native Canaga odorata, ylang-ylang
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

can you tell me the composition of canaga odarata or ylang-ylang flower? also, beneficial effects? it's for my science project..

ANSWER:

First of all, Canaga odorata (ylang-ylang) is native to tropical Asia and northern Australia. Our focus and expertise here at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center are with plants native to North America so we don't really have any information for you. Secondly, I am not absolutely sure what you mean by its "composition" unless you are referring to what chemicals are included in its oils that are considered therapeutic. There seems to be a lot of information about its oil and beneficial uses on the internet. I suggest you "Google" the scientific name (Canaga odorata) and search through the resulting citations for an answer to your questions.

 

 

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