Contact Us Host an Event Volunteer Join

Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

Help us grow by giving to the Plant Database Fund or by becoming a member

Did you know you can access the Native Plant Information Network with your web-enabled smartphone?

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
See a list of all Smarty Plants questions

Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

 
rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Monday - June 30, 2008

From: Maracaibo, Venezuela
Region: Other
Topic: Non-Natives, Shrubs
Title: Plants looking similar to Camellia sinensis in Venezuela
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

Is there another plant that looks similar to the tea plant? I need to do a photoshoot of a tea plantation, but canīt really get to one, so I was wondering if there were other plants that at least look like it. thank you

ANSWER:

Since at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, our purpose is to encourage the growth and protections of plants native to North America, we're probably not going to be able to help you very much, since we don't know what will grow in Venezuela. In the United States we have maps showing the zones of temperature variation throughout the country, but do not have those resources for South America. According to this website from The Fragrant Leaf, The Tea Plant, all types of tea are made from Camellia sinensis, a plant that grows at cooler mountain altitudes. Here is a page of pictures of tea plantations and the plant itself. Camellias are native to southern Asia, and are widely grown in the southern United States, where they are considered a winter-flowering plant. Since, again, we have no idea what will grow in the area near you, and what plants similar to camellias that would include, we have no suggestions of other plants. Perhaps you should consider going to a company that specializes in photographs for sale and see if you can make arrangements to purchase the pictures you need.

 

More Shrubs Questions

Privacy Screening Plant for New York Narrow Site
April 20, 2013 - I need privacy screening on the side of my house in Mount Kisco, New York located 40 miles north of New York City. The area gets plenty of sun but is somewhat narrow. What evergreen bushes or trees ...
view the full question and answer

Plants for a sandy slope at a weekend cabin in central WI.
June 30, 2009 - I have a cabin in central Wisconsin where the soil is equivalent to a sandy beach. There are some areas that are nearly impossible to mow because of how steep the incline is. Could you recommend som...
view the full question and answer

Late winter pruning of native Texas Sage
January 27, 2005 - I have several Texas Sage bushes that have started to get very woody and have growth only on the top. This seems to have led to a definite listing to one side. Should I trim these to the ground or...
view the full question and answer

Native plants for city lot in Longview, TX
March 19, 2008 - Just bought a city lot in Longview, TX and want to put in some plants at the periphery even before the house is built. Can you recommend any that would be from your list of East TX plants that are pa...
view the full question and answer

Erosion Control Shrubs and Groundcovers for Steep NY Wooded Slope
November 28, 2015 - I need to cover a couple of very steep slopes in upstate New York that are partially wooded and near a brook. The slopes are about 130 feet back from the brook. Someone estimated that there is a coupl...
view the full question and answer

Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.